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A Celestial Child Who Will Be With Us- Always-In Our Hearts

A tribute to a six year old darling boy who lost his life in Sandy Hook. He will never be forgotten and he will be in our hearts forever.

This is the eulogy delivered by Veronique Pozner at the funeral on Monday for her 6-year-old son, Noah:

The sky is crying, and the flags are at half-mast. It is a sad, sad day. But it is also your day, Noah, my little man. I will miss your forceful
and purposeful little steps stomping through our house. I will miss your
perpetual smile, the twinkle in your dark blue eyes, framed by eyelashes that
would be the envy of any lady in this room.

Most of all, I will miss your visions of your future. You wanted to be a doctor, a soldier, a taco factory manager. It was your favorite food, and no doubt you wanted to ensure that the world kept producing tacos.

You were a little boy whose life force had all the gravitational pull of a celestial body. You were light and love, mischief and pranks. You adored your family with every fiber of your 6-year-old being. We are all of us elevated in our humanity by having known you. A little maverick, who didn’t always want to do his schoolwork or clean up his toys, when practicing his ninja moves or Super Mario on the Wii
seemed far more important.

Noah, you will not pass through this way again. I can only believe that you were planted on Earth to bloom in heaven. Take flight, my boy. Soar. You now have the wings you always wanted. Go to that peaceful valley that we will all one day come to know. I will join you someday. Not today. I still have lots of mommy love to
give to Danielle, Michael, Sophia and Arielle.

Until then, your melody will linger in our hearts forever. Momma loves you, little man.

These are the heart breaking, sad and beautiful words from the mother of Noah Pozner killed in the Sandy Hook tragedy. No mother or father or grandparents should ever have to compose words like this.

We as parents, grandparents, daughters, sons, wives, husbands, sisters, brothers, cousins, aunts, and uncles should all feel the sadness of this and the other twenty-five surviving families of the twenty-six victims’ bereavement and mourning of these people.

Life is tough, sad and unbelievable. We mourn along with these folks, even though we do not know them. We feel we do know them from
seeing the beautiful photos of the children and the adults. One adult teacher
was to have been given an engagement ring for Christmas. All the others had
their own delightful stories and history. All of the youngsters had their whole
lives before them. They missed Christmas, birthday parties, school, fun, toys
and most of all their parents’ love and care.

We can honor them by showing our children, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, sisters, brothers and friends all the love we can give them.

My friend Melinda Press of Tampa, Florida said the following on her Facebook. She is a Cancer survivor. She wrote:

“I think that Cancer is a good excuse to back away from the commercialized things and really give thanks for what you have, your life and
your friends and supporters. Start new traditions that celebrate the things
that matter most in your life. Wishing you all a Very Happy and Healthy New
Year!!”

We all love to buy material things. There is so much to purchase, more than I ever dreamed about when I was a kid in the forties. I loved owning
a brand new book, of getting a new doll or a stuffed animal. One was the
operative word. You received one book, one doll and if your parents had some
spare money, maybe a third gift. Clothes were always a part of your holiday
gifts. If I received a new dress (in those days we wore dresses to school, no
pants were worn then); then I felt really like a rich little girl. We owned
things we needed and a bonus of a few ones for fun times.

We were satisfied with what we had, because everyone else in the neighborhood was the recipients of similar gifts at holiday time in
December of the year. There were no television sets, no IPods, no Cd players,
no cellphones, no other things that are available now to the kids and their
family members. Perhaps we were the recipients of a better time because we did
not expect or even yearn for these exciting items available now in 2013. You
cannot pick up a newspaper or a magazine without seeing ads for these marvelous items. All the young kids see these ads and ask their parents if they can have them and all of us parents and grandparents to buy them for us and we do. In my time in the forties, there were no ads for toys that I know of; maybe we heard about them from our friends or on radio ads. 
That was it.

Melinda Press knows what is important since she is a survivor and when that happens, you figure out what is really needed for a
wonderful life. Of course, material things are delightful, I love them a lot,
but the love and support of your family and friends is what counts.

As Noah’s mother said about this beautiful angel, “Noah’s life had the gravitational pull of a celestial body.”

Let us all remember now, that our children, grandchildren and all of us are here for a while. In darling Noah’s case, his was a short
time and even in that small period, he led a marvelous life where he influenced
all who loved him with his astonishing love of life and family. He will never
be forgotten, he will be revered in all the memories of those who loved him,
adored him, liked him and were privileged to have him in their lives, as short
as his time was.

Melinda sums it all up when she says “give thanks for what you have, your life and your family and friends. Celebrate the things that
matter most in your life.”

I did not know Noah, I do now. I wish I would have had the privilege to meet him, if only for a few minutes. I write this column to honor
him and the other nineteen children who left us long before their time.

Let us celebrate all that we have, because this is what matters most of all.



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 

 

 







 



The sky is crying, and the flags are at half-mast. It is a
sad, sad day. But it is also your day, Noah, my little man. I will miss your forceful
and purposeful little steps stomping through our house. I will miss your
perpetual smile, the twinkle in your dark blue eyes, framed by eyelashes that
would be the envy of any lady in this room.



 Most of all, I will
miss your visions of your future. You wanted to be a doctor, a soldier, a taco
factory manager. It was your favorite food, and no doubt you wanted to ensure
that the world kept producing tacos.



 You were a little boy
whose life force had all the gravitational pull of a celestial body. You were
light and love, mischief and pranks. You adored your family with every fiber of
your 6-year-old being. We are all of us elevated in our humanity by having
known you. A little maverick, who didn’t always want to do his schoolwork or
clean up his toys, when practicing his ninja moves or Super Mario on the Wii
seemed far more important.



 Noah, you will not
pass through this way again. I can only believe that you were planted on Earth
to bloom in heaven. Take flight, my boy. Soar. You now have the wings you
always wanted. Go to that peaceful valley that we will all one day come to
know. I will join you someday. Not today. I still have lots of mommy love to
give to Danielle, Michael, Sophia and Arielle.



 Until then, your
melody will linger in our hearts forever. Momma loves you, little man.



 



These are the heart breaking, sad and beautiful words from
the mother of Noah Pozner killed in the Sandy Hook tragedy. No mother or father
or grandparents should ever have to compose words like this.



We as parents, grandparents, daughters, sons, wives,
husbands, sisters, brothers, cousins, aunts, and uncles should all feel the
sadness of this and the other twenty-five surviving families of the twenty-six
victims’ bereavement and mourning of these 
people.



Life is tough, sad and unbelievable. We mourn along with
these folks, even though we do not know them. We feel we do know them from
seeing the beautiful photos of the children and the adults. One adult teacher
was to have been given an engagement ring for Christmas. All the others had
their own delightful stories and history. All of the youngsters had their whole
lives before them. They missed Christmas, birthday parties, school, fun, toys
and most of all their parents’ love and care.



We can honor them by showing our children, grandchildren,
aunts, uncles, sisters, brothers and friends all the love we can give them.



My friend Melinda Press of Tampa, Florida said the following
on her Facebook. She is a Cancer survivor. She wrote:



 



“I think that Cancer is a good excuse to back away from the
commercialized things and really give thanks for what you have, your life and
your friends and supporters. Start new traditions that celebrate the things
that matter most in your life. Wishing you all a Very Happy and Healthy New
Year!!”



We all love to buy material things. There is so much to purchase,
more than I ever dreamed about when I was a kid in the forties. I loved owning
a brand new book, of getting a new doll or a stuffed animal. One was the
operative word. You received one book, one doll and if your parents had some
spare money, maybe a third gift. Clothes were always a part of your holiday
gifts. If I received a new dress (in those days we wore dresses to school, no
pants were worn then); then I felt really like a rich little girl. We owned
things we needed and a bonus of a few ones for fun times.



We were satisfied with what we had, because everyone else in
the neighborhood was the recipients of similar gifts at holiday time in
December of the year. There were no television sets, no IPods, no Cd players,
no cellphones, no other things that are available now to the kids and their
family members. Perhaps we were the recipients of a better time because we did
not expect or even yearn for these exciting items available now in 2013. You
cannot pick up a newspaper or a magazine without seeing ads for these marvelous
items. All the young kids see these ads and ask their parents if they can have
them and all of us parents and grandparents to buy them for us and we do. In my
time in the forties, there were no ads for toys that I know of; maybe we heard
about them from our friends or on radio ads. 
That was it.



Melinda Press knows what is important since she is a
survivor and when that happens, you figure out what is really needed for a
wonderful life. Of course, material things are delightful, I love them a lot,
but the love and support of your family and friends is what counts.



As Noah’s mother said about this beautiful angel, “Noah’s life
had the gravitational pull of a celestial body.”



Let us all remember now, that our children, grandchildren
and all of us are here for a while. In darling Noah’s case, his was a short
time and even in that small period, he led a marvelous life where he influenced
all who loved him with his astonishing love of life and family. He will never
be forgotten, he will be revered in all the memories of those who loved him,
adored him, liked him and were privileged to have him in their lives, as short
as his time was.



Melinda sums it all up when she says “give thanks for what
you have, your life and your family and friends. Celebrate the things that
matter most in your life.”



I did not know Noah, I do now. I wish I would have had the
privilege to meet him, if only for a few minutes. I write this column to honor
him and the other nineteen children who left us long before their time.



Let us celebrate all that we have, because this is what
matters most of all.



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 

 

 



 



This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

Elita Sohmer Clayman January 01, 2013 at 04:54 PM
what a beautiful story..thanks so much for writing the wonderful, spirtual words of melinda...she is a wonderful daughter and she inspires everyone..have a great happy new year with all good things to come....phyllis
Elita Sohmer Clayman January 01, 2013 at 05:00 PM
That was a very beautiful write up...You are an amazing woman... May you have a wonderful 2013!! Happy and Healthy...Love always..your friend Melinda :)-

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